After an active summer listening to constituents’ hopes and concerns, Courtenay councilor David Frisch has announced that he will seek a second term on council rather than run for mayor in the next municipal election on Oct. 20.

In March, Frisch had announced plans for a mayoral bid and held several campaign events, like Politics Pub Nights around the city, to listen to people’s views. He says this campaign announcement comes in response to the community and requests from his supporters.

“It’s always right to put constituents first,” says Frisch. “I’ve decided to seek my second council term out of respect for all the Courtenay residents who want to see continuity and proven leadership at the council table, and who trust I will do that.”

In the last 2014 municipal election, Frisch emerged as the breakthrough new candidate who earned the single most votes for a councilor in Courtenay’s history. With 3,671 votes total, Frisch earned the support of 57% of Courtenay voters – 638 votes ahead of any other councilor and 168 votes ahead of the current mayor.

“David has made the call to put his values and especially Courtenay’s best interests first,” says Salinas Laperrier, Frisch’s campaign manager. “The way David involved his team and his family in this decision shows his integrity and commitment.”

Frisch says his switch to campaigning for a second term on council ultimately came down to how he could best serve Courtenay residents who say their primary issue is stability and having a balance of experience on the next council.

“Courtenay is growing and the public needs us to achieve big priorities like affordable housing, safer and more efficient transportation, and ongoing Downtown Revitalization,” says Frisch. “Voters want carry-through on vision and that requires having some familiar and reliable people on council with a strong track record.”

“The election context changed a lot since springtime,” explains Laperrier. “Coun. Lennox decided not to run again, and until David made this announcement, three out of six Courtenay councilors were running for mayor.”

Frisch says in the end it didn’t make sense for half of council to compete for mayor when Courtenay voters want continuity for important decision-making that lies ahead.

“I’ve invested the last four years of my life into learning how to work effectively on council,” says Frisch. “I understand the issues and how city hall works. Another council term is fundamentally where I can best do work for Courtenay and a sustainable future.”

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